Food

Fruit & vegetable wholesalers in the UK: Get acquainted with true freshness

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It’s a well-known fact that some fruits and vegetables can only grow in certain climatic conditions. Unfortunately, some countries can’t produce the right conditions to grow certain fruits and vegetables. This causes many fruit & vegetable wholesalers in the UK to import certain varieties to meet demands. This is also why in some countries certain kinds of fruits and vegetables are more expensive than in other countries. For example, in the UK, some produce is grown locally as the climate is suitable, but others are imported in large quantities to ensure everyone is happy.

What’s Currently Being Grow in the UK

Although England has varied weather conditions throughout the year, fruit & vegetable wholesalers in the UK can still produce much of it domestically. Vegetables like celery, cabbage, onions, peppers and more. You can also find locally sourced fruits such as apples, raspberries, pears, blueberries, and quite a few more. Despite the wide selection available, not all fruits and vegetables are suitable to grow in the UK. Fear not, this doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy delicious citrus fruits or yummy avocados. It just means when you’re at your local market or grocery store buying these fruits, they were imported from another country to ensure true freshness and taste.

How Much the UK Spends on Importing Citrus Fruits

For the past 20 years, fruit consumption in the UK has been on a steady rise, including fresh and dried citrus fruits. So it’s no surprise that the number of citrus fruit people eat in the UK is growing year over year. These fruits are healthy and delicious and contain many essential vitamins and minerals our bodies need to function correctly. To put this into a bit of perspective, in 2001 the country spent almost 300 million British pounds on citrus fruit imports. Over the years, that number has seen a steady increase. For example, in 2020 that number more than doubled to approximately 691 million British pounds a year.

Avocado Consumption in the UK

Another delicious fruit people around the world can’t get enough of is avocados. Unfortunately fruit & vegetable wholesalers in the UK are unable to source them locally due to the climate and soil conditions in the UK.

The superfood is popular in dishes worldwide, such as the world-famous guacamole in Mexico. Avocados are one of the most nutrient-dense foods available today. Ounce for ounce they contain some of the highest levels of fibre, folate, potassium, vitamin E and magnesium.

Did you know that according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations and OECD countries, avocados are expected to become the second most traded fruit in the world by 2030. By then, the United States and the European Union are expected to become the world’s biggest consumers of avocados. Some of the world’s top-producers of avocados are Israel, Mexico, Spain, Columbia and Kenya. Today the UK is the number three importer of avocados across Europe. In 2020 we consumed over 100,000 tonnes of avocados.

Negev Produce’s Citrus Fruits and Avocados

Negev Produce has been growing and exporting citrus fruits and avocados for many years now. Our vast knowledge and experience have helped create some of the most delicious and sought-after citrus fruits and avocados. Our main citrus fruits include oranges and lemons—fun fact: we produce around seven thousand tons of citrus fruits a year. Our lemons have a bright yellow peel and are extra juicy. Our citrus fruits are truly fresh and delicious and full of flavour.

There is no shortage of varieties to choose from when it comes to avocados. Negev Produce grows 13 different and distinct varieties of avocados for local markets and for exports to fruit & vegetable wholesalers in the UK and other locations around the world.

The next time you find yourself at your local fruits and vegetable wholesalers market or grocery store, you may be purchasing and enjoying one of Negev Produce’s delicious citrus fruits and avocados.

Vanek Hasith
the authorVanek Hasith